IMPACT

The WiLD Project has intentionally engaged a diverse spectrum of WI communities including: African American and Latinx leaders from Milwaukee and Madison, the Hmong community, Native American tribes, small family farmers, high school and college students, neighborhood organizations and groups working to impact education, health care, racial equity, economic justice, mass incarceration, and the environment. As of the start of 2019, over 1,000 leaders have been trained through one of our workshops, including 2.5-day Organizing Trainings, WI Budget Action Workshops, and more!

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TRAINED MULTIPLE TIMES

IN ACTION

Leaders trained through WiLD Project curriculum are putting theory to action and making an impact with inspiring campaigns waged across the state.

Public education organizers campaigned to make an impact on Wisconsin's state budget.2017-19 BUDGET CAMPAIGN

Together with the WI Public Education Network and other partners, we set our sights on impacting the 2017-19 WI Biennial Budget. The campaign resulted in 282 people trained from 84 cities, 6 budget hearings attended by 754 people that garnered $639 million increase in K-12 public education funding. According to former Joint Finance Committee Member, Rep. Katrina Shankland, “They were the most organized and most powerful group in the room.”

Organizers from across the state gathered in Milwaukee for a budget action training.

2019-21 BUDGET CAMPAIGN

In early 2019, WiLD partnered with the ACLU of WI and WI Public Education Network to train over 300 people in four regions on: the budget process, telling your story as a way of giving testimony, and developing local organizing tactics. Action teams were formed by legislative district to advocate for a WI Biennial Budget that divests in mass incarceration and invests in K-12 public education. Half the participants were doing this for the first time, and went on to testify at the public budget hearings.

Student organizers at the University of Wisconsin gathered to plan their impact on racial justice.BLIND SIDE

Students experiencing racism on UW Madison’s campus formed Blind Side—to win a majority of student council seats and gain access to power and resources they didn’t have. The team grew to 90 trained students across campus who increased student voter turnout by 58%. In March 2016, they elected a slate of 19 members to the 29 available student council seats and won! They planned to address the effects of privatization on UW campuses, hate crimes, and a dismantled student governance structure.

SAVE OUR CHILDREN PEACE MARCH

In 2015, Wausau’s Hmong community—who arrived in the area over 40 years ago as refugees and now wanting to step more fully into their role as citizens—had to deal with a very public tragedy. As a result of a bullying dispute between two groups of Wausau youth, a threatened Hmong teenager took the life of another student during a neighborhood confrontation. Dylan Yang, 15 years-old, was being tried as an adult and faced 60 years in federal prison. What came next was the largest Hmong-led march in the history of Wisconsin. Over 1,000 people stood in solidarity to address bullying in schools and leniency for Dylan.

Environmental organizers made an impact by protecting their watershed from mining.PROTECT THE WILLOW FLOWAGE

In 2018, a grassroots team of “political rookies” from Oneida County and the Lac du Flambeau Tribe set out to inform their community about the urgent need to protect the Willow River and Flowage from the risks of sulfide mining being proposed in a November ballot referendum. With only a few months to get organized and the support of the River Alliance of WI, they campaigned tirelessly—going door-to-door, holding conversations with their neighbors, showing up at town halls and getting the facts out. Despite being in a traditionally conservative leaning county, 62% of voters said NO to mining!

Some WiLD leaders choose to make their impact through public office.
PUBLIC OFFICE

Many WiLD-trained leaders have gone on to run for public office at all levels. A significant number are actively involved in voter engagement through registering new voters, educating citizens on their rights and relevant issues, and getting them out on election day.

PARTNERS

ORGANIZING TIPS, UPCOMING WORKSHOPS, OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACTION–ALL IN YOUR INBOX

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